Start with a free account for 3 free CME credits. Already a subscriber? Sign in.

Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) & C-reactive Protein (CRP)

Matthew DeLaney, MD and Matthieu DeClerck, MD
00:00
15:08
Sign in or subscribe to listen

No me gusta!

The flash player was unable to start. If you have a flash blocker then try unblocking the flash content - it should be visible below.

ESR and CRP are readily available acute phase reactants. While these markers have a moderate degree of sensitivity for a wide variety of inflammatory and infectious processes, their lack of specificity limits their widespread use in clinical practice.

 

To view chapter written summaries, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes.

John B., MD -

I am clearly not busy enough on my urgent care shift today. Mathieu and Mathew, I believe, misspoke about the sed rate. Actually: Erythrocyte sedimentation rate — The ESR, defined as the rate (expressed in mm/hour) at which erythrocytes suspended in plasma fall when placed in a vertical tube. So the red blood cells settle faster when the sed rate is elevated. A minor technical point.

To join the conversation, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes and to join the conversation.

To download files, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes.
Difficult patient vs. personality disorder? Full episode audio for MD edition 187:27 min - 88 MB - M4AHippo Urgent Care RAP - May 2019 Written Summary 572 KB - PDF

To earn CME for this chapter, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes and earn CME.

0.25 Free AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ certified by Hippo Education

  1. Complete Quiz
  2. Complete Evaluation
  3. Print Certificate

3.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ certified by Hippo Education

  1. Complete Quiz
  2. Complete Evaluation
  3. Print Certificate