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Treating Lower Back Pain, What the Evidence Suggests

Bryan Hayes, PharmD, Mizuho Morrison, DO, and Mike Weinstock, MD
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22:50
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Bryan Hayes reviews the most current evidence on the most effective drugs for treating idiopathic low back pain.

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Tabor D., PA-C -

At our urgent care we have a policy of not prescribing opiate pain meds. When you have someone with chronic back pain that is traveling from another state and asks for a refill of Percocet, what do you usually do or say? I fill awkward because some patients with chronic back pain have been on opiate pain meds for years prescribed by their doctor and then I'm explaining to them that studies show them not to be effective.

Mike W., MD -

Good question and this is a tough situation. In my practice, I never do this. It has the feel of a 'the dog ate my homework' type of complaint, and additionally, the pt needs to make sure if they are on chronic opiates, they have made allocation for their meds. I totally get the fact that they may have lost their Rx or gone through it too quickly, but since I don't even believe in chronic opiates for non-cancer pain (in general), I would not refill another provider's script. Thx for the question and good luck!!

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Holiday Strains in the Urgent Care Full episode audio for MD edition 193:29 min - 91 MB - M4Ahippo Urgent Care RAP - December 2016 Summary 275 KB - PDF