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Calciphylaxis

Mizuho Morrison, DO and Sam Ashoo, MD
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Sam and Miz discuss the diagnosis of calciphylaxis, which are indolent lesions involving the thighs commonly in dialysis patients. Typically gradual in onset, we need to consider calciphylaxis (CUA) if a necrotic core is present. This disease is rare but has a high mortality rate associated, hence this life threatening condition requires immediate initiation of therapy.

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John B., MD -

I saw a case of calciphylaxis in urgent care a few days after I listened to the lecture. The patient was a renal failure patient, post kidney transplant times 2. He had a blue tender finger that had a black spot on it. X-rays of the finger showed extensive continuous arterial calcifications. There was a painful lesion on the left flank with a central black area. The lesion was flat. There was a painful lesion on the right flank that was red and indurated. Disposition was the emergency room for this and other reasons.

Mike W., MD -

Thx for sharing - great case!

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Avoiding Burnout Full episode audio for MD edition 206:04 min - 97 MB - M4AHippo UC RAP August 2018 Written Summary 493 KB - PDF