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Introduction: Jones vs Dancers Fractures

Mike Weinstock, MD and Mizuho Morrison, DO
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The primary differentiation in the urgent care is between a fracture of the tuberosity (an avulsion fracture) which is managed symptomatically and a Jones fracture or fracture of the proximal diaphysis which may require orthopedic expertise. A proximal 5th metatarsal fracture of the tuberosity (most proximal segment) is managed with a hard shoe, analgesia, and ambulation with expected full recovery. On the contrary, a Jones fracture (through the metaphysis of the 5th metatarsal bone) may be initially managed conservatively, but will often require surgery. Immobilization alone for a Jones fracture often results in nonunion or delayed union.

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