Start with a free account for 12 free CME credits. Already a subscriber? Sign in.
Chapter 6

Cauda Equina Syndrome

Rob Orman, MD and Britt Long, MD
00:00
33:00
Sign in or subscribe to listen

No me gusta!

The flash player was unable to start. If you have a flash blocker then try unblocking the flash content - it should be visible below.

Brit Long breaks down the characteristics, diagnosis, pitfalls, and clinical conundrums in patients with suspected cauda equina syndrome. 

To view chapter written summaries, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes.

David G. -

Although there's passing reference to "lower motor dysfunction" as a symptom of cauda equina syndrome, the majority of this talk is on more subtle neurologic assessment.

Nonetheless, I've reviewed multiple cases (med/mal claims) where the patient was never walked in the ED, and indeed, never walked again after leaving the ED. The documented neuro exam in such cases (if there really even was one) was often something like "moves all extremities."

So I agree, assessing for subtle perineum area dysfunction is appropriate, but for heaven's sake, get the patient out of bed and walk them. Remember the old adage, "The patient doesn't go home unless they can get up and walk out the door."

David Glaser, Denver

Rob O., MD -

Well said Dave! Sometimes we lose the forest for the trees and the obvious stuff gets overlooked.

To join the conversation, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes and to join the conversation.

To earn CME for this chapter, you need to subscribe.

Sign up today for full access to all episodes and earn CME.

2.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ certified by Hippo Education (2020)